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'Artist. Designer. Writer. Committed -yet preoccupied- citizen of the world.
And much more, I guess.
'


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Aug 30, 2013

Design / Art
Works / Projects

Pete Fowler ‘The Needle and The Damage Done’
Yes, the show’s title makes a reference to Neil Young’s 1972 track.

I recently did some stitch embroidery work with the World of Sama. The black and white pieces were a truly hit so they may be part of my new collection. As a big fan of Pete Fowler‘s work (and stitch embroidery, obviously), I wish I could see his show! ‘The Needle and The Damage Done’ is a body of new and original cross-stitch embroidery made during 2013. Colourful and psychedelic pieces, featuring Fowler’s traditionally outlandish juxtapostion of subject matter; Landscapes, UFO’s, Sailors, Roadies, Synths and Owls eschew the craft-like subject matter one would normally associate with the medium. 1/8/13 – 1/9/13 Beach London Gallery 20 Cheshire St, London, E2 6EH http://www.beachlondon.co.uk/




Aug 28, 2013

World

Helping Congo Help Itself
Or: 'What It Will Take to End Africa’s Worst War'

Once in a while (and obviously not as often as I wished), I read an interesting piece on Congo providing a great insight on a delicate situation. Jason Stearns‘ article published on Foreign Affairs website is definitely a good one. He writes: Congo’s problems are complex, but certainly not beyond repair. First, however, it is necessary to diagnose the conflict’s root causes and understand its protagonists’ interests. Although Western media have often taken shortcuts, focusing in particular on the scourge of sexual violence and conflict minerals, a close reading suggests that it is not local warlords and mining companies that are the key players in this drama but the Congolese and Rwandan governments. Stearns adds: Congo’s government is not only extremely weak, but it is also beholden to a political logic of patronage that undermines the reform of its own state and encourages the creation of competing armed groups. Meanwhile,…Read more




Aug 25, 2013

Environment
Health
Science
World

Fukushima: Cosmic rays and radioactive bluefin tuna
More than two years after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, news are not good. At all.

Let start with this article by Jeremy Hsu, on LiveScience: Cosmic Rays May Reveal Damage to Fukushima’s Nuclear Reactors. Radiation is still leaking from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the 2011 tsunami-related meltdown in Japan, making any damage assessment dangerous for both humans and machines. Instead, high-energy particles created by cosmic rays striking the Earth’s atmosphere could provide an X-ray-style image of the damage from a much safer distance. And this article by Ann Werner: Radioactive Bluefin Tuna Caught Off California Coast. Every bluefin tuna tested in the waters off California has shown to be contaminated with radiation that originated in Fukushima. Every single one. Told you, news are not good at all…




Aug 25, 2013

Health

Spread the word about Malaria and the plant that could save lives
Malaria is one of the leading poverty-related diseases and causes of death in children under five years old

The Lantana camara plant grows in much of sub-Saharan Africa and is a natural mosquito repellant. Concern Worldwide has partnered with other organizations to develop a research team that planted Lantana around 231 houses, then measured the number of mosquitoes inside people’s homes. Those houses with Lantana had 56% fewer of the most common malaria-carrying mosquitoes in Africa, and 50% fewer mosquitoes of any kind. I’ve watched and will share Concern Worldwide’s video on fighting malaria. I will help bring awareness to the gravity of malaria and how Concern is using natural resources to lower the cases of infection in countries where people live in extreme poverty and health care is scarce. Take the pledge on TakePart!




Aug 24, 2013

Movies
TV Shows

The weirdest-looking time machines in all Science Fiction
Time machines are not 'weird', only their look can be!

Remember The Project Tic-Toc, a secret experimental time machine of the U.S Army in Time Tunnel? The DeLorean from Back To The Future? The TARDIS Type 40 time travel capsule from Doctor Who? The eight-spoked Frozen Wheel from Lost? Not to mention The Hot Tub Time Machine… They are indeed the weirdest-looking time machines in all Science Fiction and they’re all listed (picture and/or video) in this post on io9.




Aug 22, 2013

World

Stop investing in genocidal Sudan

Divestment. I already mentioned it several times on this Blog (tag: Divestment for more), as well as the work done by Investors Against Genocide. Marc Gunther is a veteran journalist and writer whose focus is business and sustainability. He is editor at large of Guardian Sustainable Business US and is the author or co-author of four books. He recently posted on The Guardian: Call me old school but, in my view, companies should be accountable to their owners. They should also try to stay away from repressive governments like the one in Sudan, where millions of people have been killed in a long-running genocide. So when, as part of a campaign to stop the flow of money to Sudan, investors voted to ask a mutual fund managed by ING US to sell its holdings in companies that “contribute to genocide or crimes against humanity,” you’d think that ING US would…Read more




Aug 21, 2013

Environment

As of today, we are consuming more than Earth can replenish this year
Nothing much to celebrate on Earth Overshoot Day...

If you still think everything is fine on our dearly Planet Earth, this article by Lindsey Kratochwill published on Popular Science makes it clear: we are on track to needing two Earths before we reach the middle of the century… Today is Earth Overshoot Day. Happy Earth Overshoot Day! Except, well, we don’t much feel like celebrating. That’s because Earth Overshoot Day is the day each year when we’ve consumed natural resources at a rate beyond which our planet can replenish, and have produced more waste than can be reabsorbed, according to the Global Footprint Network, a think tank based in the U.S., Switzerland, and Belgium. The holiday was originally conceived of by Andrew Simms, of the U.K. think tank New Economics Foundation. This year, it falls on August 20, two days (or three, depending on the calculations) earlier than it came last year, following a relatively steady trend since…Read more




Aug 20, 2013

Movies

Filming on the Fringe
Two female filmmakers from Yemen and Saudi Arabia are using film to fight for change

In the midst of a nascent film industry, a handful of female filmmakers have emerged in the Arabian Peninsula, pioneering film in the region and using it as a tool to fight for change. Saudi Arabia and Yemen both present volatile environments for any director; in the former, cinemas are illegal, and in both, authorization from the government prior to shooting is obligatory. However, in these conservative, patriarchal societies, the challenges for female filmmakers are even greater… Full article on Fair Observer.




Aug 18, 2013

Misc.

Government surveillance spurs Americans to fight back
'For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction'

Designers trying to help people fight government surveillance: Activists turn to fashion to provide ways to block eavesdropping, confuse cameras and thwart drones — and to provoke conversations about U.S. surveillance programs. Read article and view photo gallery on The Washington Post.




Aug 18, 2013

Tech

Martin Aircraft’s Prototype 12 on sale in 2015

Last year, I posted: Forget the jet pack, here come PATS and PAVs!.  “Sometimes you wish a  news was true, especially when it comes to single seater personal air transport or jet pack. Do you remember the James Bond movie Thunderball? I wanted to have my own jet pack so bad after I watched  Sean Connery use one to escape the bad guys! And now this may be a dream come true…” Well, jet packs may still have a bright future, according to a recent article on C|Net: The jetpack, which Martin Aircraft calls a “motorbike in the sky,” is made of a carbon fiber composite with a bit of Kevlar for the rotor. A gasoline engine drives ducted fans that produce enough thrust to lift the one-person aircraft into a vertical takeoff and enable sustained flight before a vertical landing (in a 2011 test, the jetpack stayed aloft, with a dummy on-board, for more than seven…Read more





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